Karsten Malsch

Karsten Malsch

Dr Karsten Malsch has been venture manager of the CO2-based polyols program since March 2014, and has worked for Covestro and Bayer for the past 17 years.

Born on September 17, 1966, in Radevormwald, Germany, Malsch studied chemistry and economics at Cologne University. After graduating, he went on to obtain a PhD in chemistry.

Malsch joined Bayer in 1999 and has since held several positions within the company. His first assignment was with Bayer’s Corporate Planning department, from where he moved on to join Bayer’s Polyurethanes business in 2001.

In 2004, he became Head of Business Planning and Administration in the Coatings, Adhesives and Specialties Business Unit of Bayer MaterialScience. Five years later, Malsch joined the Procurement & Trading department, with responsibility for the global procurement of strategic commodities. In 2013, he moved on to the Polyurethanes Business Unit to assume responsibility for the systems house business in Europe, Middle East and Latin America.

 

You’re speaking at SusPolyUrethane Conference 2016, what made you decide to get involved?

The conference is an excellent opportunity to share Covestro’s work in the area of sustainability in general and more specific regarding our newly developed cardyon® technology for the use of CO2 as raw material with a large industry community. The line-up of speakers and the broad range of participants will for sure offer a great platform for exchange about sustainability, a topic of utmost relevance for our industry.

 

What are the main challenges ahead of the industry?

Our industry shares the universal push towards more sustainability; it is simply the only way to make ends meet in a modern society. The materials we produce replace other materials that are less sustainable in production and during their lifetime. If you take insulation foam for example, approximately 51 million kWh of energy is saved each year in the EU alone by the use of polyurethane insulation.

It is therefore in our industry’s and the planet’s interest to convince partners and end-consumers about the benefits of our materials.

We are contributing to a more sustainable future already. But we can – and should – do more. We should also be willing to go the extra mile to do so. The industry must also come up with more sustainable chemistry & processes, such as using CO2 as a feedstock for polyurethanes.

 

Over recent years, what do you see as the most significant development to have happened in the industry?

Polyurethanes have come a long way and have proven to be indispensable in our daily lives, from refrigerators to upholstery. That is a big success story for its own. Insulation will play an increasing role in the world’s journey towards more energy efficiency. We also see increasing amounts of polyurethane in the mobility sector due to the striving for lightweight yet stable and highly advanced materials.

 

What single development would do most to improve the future of the industry, and why?

It would be unjust to the industry to single out one development. Research, development and continuous improvement are a never ending process in our industry. We for example improve our energy efficiency in our production step by step. We develop our materials in close collaboration with each customer and their needs. We develop processes which include increasing amounts of alternative and renewable raw materials in our products. The push for sustainability and circular economy for sure present a huge opportunity for our industry.

 

Looking into the crystal ball, what big changes do you expect to see in PU and the industry by 2030?

We will produce with ever higher efficiency while using less energy. Our products will contain more and more alternative and more sustainable raw materials. And our products will get better and better, substituting further less sustainable materials. With that said I am quite optimistic that the PU industry will continue to grow and help society to achieve its goals with regards to sustainability and protection of our planet.

 

What are you looking forward to at SusPolyUrethane Conference 2016?

This is an important event to gather the latest views on sustainability and polyurethanes from a wide range of stakeholders.

 

Can you describe your company in 10 words or less?

Covestro is the world’s leading high tech polymer supplier!

 

KARSTEN MALSCH WILL BE SPEAKING IN THE AFTERNOON OF THE SECOND DAY OF THE SUSPOLYURETHANE CONFERENCE 2016. HIS PRESENTATION IS ENTITLED: DREAM PRODUCTION – CO¬2-POLYOLS: NEW SUSTAINABLE RAW MATERIALS FOR POLYURETHANES

Richard Northcote

richard-northcote

Richard Northcote has a wealth of experience in construction, journalism, communications and chemicals. He has lived and worked in a variety of European countries, the Middle East and Asia. He has worked in the chemicals industry since 1996 and joined Covestro AG (formerly Bayer MaterialScience) in 2009, where he serves as Chief Sustainability Officer.

Richard Northcote is a Steering Committee member of the Oxford University
Business Economics Programme (OUBEP); an advisor to the Board of the European Institute for Industrial Leadership (EIIL) and a member of the Editorial Board of Reed Business International’s chemical magazine ICIS.

 

You’re speaking at SusPolyUrethane Conference 2016, what made you decide to get involved?

I believe that SusPolyUrethane 2016 is an important event for the industry and for the sustainable development of the products we bring and the technology we develop. That’s why I chose to speak at this conference.

 

What are the main challenges ahead of the industry?

One of the main challenges is the industry’s ability to promote itself and the benefits that polyurethanes bring. The many advantages of polyurethane need to be highlighted more effectively in various industries and thereby allow the replacement of less effective materials.

We need to better push the value proposition of PUR/PIR in insulation. While it is indeed a fossil based material, when you look at it as an investment of carbon to save carbon, there is no better way to invest a fossil-based material.
Another huge advantage that polyurethane materials deliver is their light weight, couple with structural strength. By communicating more effectively we can convince industries to adopt many technologies that will deliver sustainable benefits. New technologies are appearing that will benefit the automotive and alternative energy sectors and we, as an industry, need to take advantage of these by convincing these industrial sectors of the benefits we can bring.

 

Over recent years, what do you see as the most significant development to have happened in the industry?

The industry has grown in its own right, as annual growth rates show. It has grown from nothing into a huge international industry. Polyurethane has earned a solid reputation as a versatile material over the decades. The simple refrigerator was one of the early winners and the insulation qualities of our materials, which are still improving, have spread throughout the cold chain. Insulation and automotive applications are huge sectors where polyurethanes have played an increasingly important role.

 

What single development would do most to improve the future of the industry, and why?

I don’t believe there is one single development that one could pinpoint. Continuous developments will maintain the role of polyurethanes in addressing the needs of the various industry sectors we serve. As society focuses further on reducing our environmental impact on the planet, we will see more demand for the lightweigtht solutions we provide. The more we continue to sustainably improve our products, the more demand there will be from the market.

 

Looking into the crystal ball, what big changes do you expect to see in PU and the industry by 2030?

We will develop more sustainable raw materials, better end product quality and the polyurethanes market will continue to grow

 

What are you looking forward to at SusPolyUrethane Conference 2016?

The big driver for me is always the discussion around Sustainability. I want to hear positive discussion around the enormous opportunities our industry has as the world strives to address the COP21 agreement and as countries and industries play their part in addressing the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. These should be drivers for us as an industry as we have so many solutions that can help society achieve the targets.

 

Can you describe your company in 10 words or less?

Curious, courageous and colourful. Making the world a brighter place

 

RICHARD NORTHCOTE WILL BE SPEAKING IN THE MORNING OF THE FIRST DAY OF THE SUSPOLYURETHANE CONFERENCE 2016. HIS KEYNOTE IS ENTITLED: ARE WE GETTING THE MOST OUT OF OUR RESOURCES, OR CAN WE IMPROVE?

 

Shpresa Kotaji

Shpresa Kotaji

Shpresa Kotaji studied Industrial Chemistry in Brussels, Belgium. She joined ICI Polyurethanes, now Huntsman Polyurethanes, in 1988 in the Research and Development department. In 1995 she joined the International Environmental Affairs Group and became the company expert in Life Cycle Assessment. She is now Sustainability Manager and manages various issues such as Climate Change, Sustainable Development, Environmental Labelling and Waste Management, both for Huntsman and for several polyurethanes related industry associations. She chairs PU Europe’s Safety, health & Environment Committee.

 

You’re speaking at SusPolyUrethane Conference 2016, what made you decide to get involved?

Sustainability or, more recently, resource efficiency, have become major societal goals. Both market expectations and regulatory requirements increasingly push industry to demonstrate compliance with these goals. The PU thermal insulation industry has a tempting story to tell, but further improvements a necessary and possible. We are here to talk about upcoming EU regulatory challenges in terms of the circular economy.

 

What are the main challenges ahead of the industry?

Multiple challenges lie ahead of the industry, but none of them is insurmountable. With new insulation materials entering the market, PU must defend its premium position in terms of thermal conductivity. Economically and environmentally sound end-of-life solutions must be developed and the share of renewable ingredients increased. Efforts must be undertaken to minimise the use of hazardous substances which may become obstacles to recycling activities at the end of the product life. Last but no least, the industry must further enhance solutions to comply with ever stricter fire regulations.

 

Over recent years, what do you see as the most significant development to have happened in the industry?

PU thermal insulation has grown from a niche product into a widely used solution.

 

What single development would do most to improve the future of the industry, and why?

It is impossible to limit a very complex environment to one single aspect. We have consistently promoted a holistic approach to product performance including all life cycle stages as well as all burdens and benefits.

 

Looking into the crystal ball, what big changes do you expect to see in PU and the industry by 2030?

The PU thermal insulation industry should enjoy further growth for the years to come with growth rates exceeding those of the overall insulation market. Recent developments show that further improvements in thermal conductivity are possible. I expect to industry to have put in place truly sustainable end-of-life solutions and to use more renewable ingredients.

 

What are you looking forward to at SusPolyUrethane Conference 2016?

We look forward to learning about new, more sustainable solutions for the PU industry and hope that a strategic discussion will take place on where the industry should be in 10 to 20 years from now.

 

Can you describe your company in 10 words or less?

PU Europe is the European polyurethane insulation producers association.

 

SHPRESA KOTAJI WILL BE SPEAKING IN THE MORNING OF THE SECOND DAY OF THE SUSPOLYURETHANE CONFERENCE 2016. HER KEYNOTE IS ENTITLED: THE EUROPEAN COMMISSION’S CIRCULAR ECONOMY PROPOSALS – WHAT DOES IT MEAN FOR POLYURETHANE FOAM?

Michael Costello

mike costello

Michael Costello has been Stahl’s Director of Sustainability since October 2015.

Michael has a broad experience in the chemical industry in a variety of positions. In 1988, he joined Stahl USA as a process & lab chemist and later in commercial positions in the coatings segment. In 1996 he became industry specialist at Stahl Europe and also led the successful MRPII Class A implementation project for Stahl Ibérica.

After a break of six years as EMEA Sales Manager at GE Silicones (now Momentive), Michael re-joined Stahl in 2005. As Group Director, he established the Picassian Polymers SBU within Stahl (now Stahl Polymers). Stahl Polymers supplies raw materials to coatings formulators and has become a recognized player in the market.

Michael holds a Bachelor degree in Chemistry from The University College, Dublin, Ireland, and an MBA from the University of Massachusetts, Boston.

 

You’re speaking at SusPolyUrethane Conference 2016, what made you decide to get involved?

Stahl is a supplier of many different products, including polyurethanes, to the leather and coatings industries respectively. This conference falls outside our normal sphere of activity and we would like to grow our influence in new spaces. That’s why we are involved.

 

What are the main challenges ahead of the industry?

The main challenge is to reduce the environmental footprint of the supply chain while maintaining a high level of performance and technical service.

 

Over recent years, what do you see as the most significant development to have happened in the industry?

The restriction of certain substances, commonly used in the manufacturing of polyurethanes, has been a key development in the coatings industry.

 

What single development would do most to improve the future of the industry, and why?

A high-performance polyurethane made from only renewable raw materials which could be easily recyclable & bio-degradable (or compostable) when cured into a film.
This could allow us to make progress in developing circular systems for high performance coated materials.

 

Looking into the crystal ball, what big changes do you expect to see in PU and the industry by 2030?

I expect there will be more restriction on the specific substances used to manufacture polyurethanes. Expected performance levels of polyurethanes will continue to rise at the same time.

 

What are you looking forward to at SusPolyUrethane Conference 2016?

Hearing about what the wider industry expects for the future of polyurethanes.

 

Can you describe your company in 10 words or less?

“If it can be imagined, it can be created.”

MICHAEL COSTELLO WILL BE SPEAKING IN THE AFTERNOON OF THE FIRST DAY OF THE SUSPOLYURETHANE CONFERENCE 2016. HIS PRESENTATION IS ENTITLED: BIO-BASED POLYURETHANES FOR COATING APPLICATIONS IN AUTOMOTIVE INTERIOR.

Matt Terwillegar

 

MT

Hailing from Lake Worth, Florida, Matt completed undergraduate studies in Organic Chemistry at Rollins College in Winter Park, Florida and graduate studies in Chemical Engineering at The University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. His first industrial experience was with Reichhold Chemical in Research Triangle Park, NC, working in the unsaturated and saturated polyester resins where he focused on adhesive and coating raw materials. For eight years, he worked for Piedmont Chemical in High Point, North Carolina as a product development specialist, focusing on UV and thermoset raw materials. In October of 2014, Matt joined Myriant Corporation as the U.S. Account Manager where he focuses on new product and business development of derivatives of bio-based succinic acid.

 

You’re speaking at SusPolyUrethane Conference 2016, what made you decide to get involved?

At Myriant, we strive to create new technologies utilizing bio-renewable resources. We felt the conference would be an ideal venue to reveal some of our work
What are the main challenges ahead of the industry?

We must demonstrate that the use of bio-renewable resources does not bring performance issues to the table.
Over recent years, what do you see as the most significant development to have happened in the industry?

Significant capital investments in infrastructure to develop bio-renewable technologies prove that we are in this business to stay. However, the decline in the price of crude oil has provided significant challenges to our industry

What single development would do most to improve the future of the industry, and why?

The development of cost effective, bio-renewable isocyanates.

Looking into the crystal ball, what big changes do you expect to see in PU and the industry by 2030?

Further and further ground-breaking technologies in bio-renewable technology

What are you looking forward to at SusPolyUrethane Conference 2016?
A successful opportunity to showcase Myriant products

Can you describe your company in 10 words or less?

Cost-effective, bio -renewable performance

MATT TERWILLEGAR WILL BE SPEAKING IN THE AFTERNOON OF THE FIRST DAY OF THE SUSPOLYURETHANE CONFERENCE 2016. HIS PRESENTATION IS ENTITLED: SOYBEAN OIL MODIFIED POLYESTER POLYOLS FOR FLEXIBLE URETHANE FOAM.

 

 

 

Patrick Piot

patric-piot

Patrick Piot is Vice President Marketing & Strategy at BioAmber Inc. Located in US and Canada, BioAmber is at the forefront of industrial biotechnologies. BioAmber pioneered the development of the first commercially viable technology package for making bio-based succinic acid from renewable feedtstock and is now operating the largest bio-succinic acid production facility, located in Sarnia, Ontario. In his role, Patrick leads marketing activities, develops and manages strategic partnerships and alliances.

Prior to becoming VP Marketing & Strategy, Patrick was 5 years VP Business Development at BioAmber. He also worked 15 years in various sales, purchasing and business development positions at Rhône-Poulenc, Bayer and Agro-industries Recherches & Dévelopments. Patrick holds a Master of Science in Agronomy from AgroParisTech and an MBA from INSEAD, France.
You’re speaking at SusPolyUrethane Conference 2016, what made you decide to get involved?
BioAmber reached a tipping point in its development, with the start-up of its new bio-succinic acid facility in Canada. Hence, this is important for us to explain our value proposition to potential customers.

What are the main challenges ahead of the industry?
We all need to decrease our carbon footprint, while keeping same levels of performance. Our world doesn’t have the choice anymore!

Over recent years, what do you see as the most significant development to have happened in the industry?
Synthetic biology and other new genetic tools: they allow the industry to access bio-based building block that are novel, cost effective, more sustainable and that bring differentiated performances.

What single development would do most to improve the future of the industry, and why?
The increasing availability of low carbon footprint building blocks

Looking into the crystal ball, what big changes do you expect to see in PU and the industry by 2030?
Bio-based chemicals will have taken a significant market share from their petrochemicals equivalents, leading to significant changes in the value chain

What are you looking forward to at SusPolyUrethane Conference 2016?
I look forward to exchanging on sustainable PU solutions, interacting with potential customers and industry experts!

Can you describe your company in 10 words or less?
The world leader on bio-based succinic acid production, the alternative to petro-adipic acid.

PATRICK PIOT WILL BE SPEAKING IN THE AFTERNOON OF THE SECOND DAY OF THE SUSPOLYURETHANE CONFERENCE 2016. HIS PRESENTATION IS ENTITLED: BIO-BASED SUCCINATE POLYOLS FOR SUSTAINABLE PU ADHESIVES.

Click here to find out how you can book your place at this conference.

Angela Austin

angela passport

Angela Austin has over twenty years of management consultancy and industry experience in the polyurethane industry, mainly as an Associate Director with IAL Consultants of London, having been involved directly or indirectly in all their work for the global PU industry since the mid 1980’s until 2009.

She then worked as the Editor and Editor in Chief for a trade magazine in the polyurethane industry – PU Magazine International, published in Germany. She regularly has requests to present papers on the market dynamics of the polyurethanes industry and has done so at several international conferences. She has science degrees in Chemistry and Environmental Technology from Queen Elizabeth College and Imperial College, London. She is currently Director of Labyrinth Research & Markets Ltd, a market research and communications company she founded in 2010. Since May 2016,she has been a member of the UN Foams Technical Options Committee.

You’re speaking at SusPolyUrethane Conference 2016, what made you decide to get involved?

Sustainability is not something that will happen but is a trend that is here and now in the chemical and polyurethane industry. It’s an important topic in which I have been interested since studying environmental technology at university.

What are the main challenges ahead of the industry?

Creating sustainably resourced chemicals that are cost competitive with petroleum based chemicals.
Over recent years, what do you see as the most significant development to have happened in the industry?

The growing use of raw materials produced using biotechnology, recycled materials and natural oil products in the production of polyurethane materials.

Looking into the crystal ball, what big changes do you expect to see in PU and the industry by 2030?
End of life solutions for the huge volumes of polyurethane materials that are produced each year will be a major challenge for the industry and its long term sustainability.

What are you looking forward to at SusPolyUrethane Conference 2016?

Meeting industry personnel who are actively involved with achieving sustainability goals for their companies and polyurethane products.

Can you describe your company in 10 words or less?
Labyrinth Research & Markets is a small market research and communications consultancy working in the polyurethane industry.

ANGELA AUSTIN WILL BE SPEAKING IN THE MORNING OF THE SECOND DAY OF THE SUSPOLYURETHANE CONFERENCE 2016. HER KEYNOTE IS ENTITLED: SUSTAINABILITY ALONG THE PU SUPPLY CHAIN – PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE.